pay gap – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:47:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://feminaust.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png pay gap – Feminaust http://feminaust.org/ 32 32 Women now pay more than men on average at Cardiff council https://feminaust.org/women-now-pay-more-than-men-on-average-at-cardiff-council/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:47:54 +0000 https://feminaust.org/women-now-pay-more-than-men-on-average-at-cardiff-council/ The ‘great progress’ in closing the gender pay gap has been hailed as the average average salary for women is now higher than for men on Cardiff council. Female council staff are being paid 50p more than male staff on the average hourly rate – the first time women on average have been paid more […]]]>

The ‘great progress’ in closing the gender pay gap has been hailed as the average average salary for women is now higher than for men on Cardiff council. Female council staff are being paid 50p more than male staff on the average hourly rate – the first time women on average have been paid more than men on the council.

But according to the median hourly rate, another kind of average, men are paid 90p more than women. Reasons for the narrowing pay gap include fewer female staff in lower paid roles, more severance claims and less use of wage sacrifice schemes.

At a cabinet meeting, council leader Huw Thomas said: “It’s hugely positive news that the gender pay gap is growing. There is still work to be done on the median. But it is certainly another important step in the right direction. Hopefully some of the measures that have been put in place or strengthened over the past five years, around women’s mentoring and networking, can help women move further into higher paying roles that will also close this median gap. It’s really good to see.

Read more:Cardiff offers to host Euro 2028 football matches at Principality Stadium

Male council staff are paid an average hourly rate of £15.33 and female staff are paid £15.83. Using the median hourly rate, male staff are paid £14.11 and female staff £13.21. The figures were revealed in the council’s annual salary policy report.

Average averages are calculated by adding each employee’s hourly rate and dividing the total by the number of employees. Median averages are calculated by lining up each employee’s hourly rates from lowest to highest and choosing the exact middle rate.

Councilor Chris Weaver, Cabinet Member for Finance, said: “This year is the first year that the average amount of pay men and women receive, women actually receive more than men. In terms of the median, however, it still shows slightly higher median salaries for men than for women on the board. What this suggests is that we are very close to parity between the different ranks between men and women and that for the first time we have seen the pay gap work in a different way.

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130+ female CTOs in Europe: the full list https://feminaust.org/130-female-ctos-in-europe-the-full-list/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 05:00:48 +0000 https://feminaust.org/130-female-ctos-in-europe-the-full-list/ It’s no secret that there’s low gender parity in tech roles at startups — and it gets worse higher up in the ranks. According to watercraft, only 5% of leadership positions in the UK tech sector are held by women. not great when about 25% of the UK’s tech workforce is made up of women. […]]]>

It’s no secret that there’s low gender parity in tech roles at startups — and it gets worse higher up in the ranks.

According to watercraft, only 5% of leadership positions in the UK tech sector are held by women. not great when about 25% of the UK’s tech workforce is made up of women. The figures are not much better across Europe.

Even once women work in tech, they are disproportionately more likely to face obstacles in their careers compared to their male counterparts. Last year, Sifted reported that most UK scale-ups have a below average gender pay gap — and one report found that women on average value themselves £6,000 less than their male counterparts.

Against all odds, women are still progressing in technical roles across Europe.

Atomico’s 2021 report on the state of European technology revealed that women represent almost a third of the next generation of European technology leaders. Last year Deloitte found that big tech companies steadily increase their female representation.

With the help of our lovely readers on Twitter and Andy Skipper from CTO Craft, we’ve compiled a master list of European female CTOs.

The UK has the highest number of female CTOs, with 38% of the women on this list based in the UK, compared to 20% based in France and 10% in Germany.

Of course, this list is not exhaustive — so actual figures on the number of CTOs from different parts of Europe may differ.

Find our full list of over 130 female CTOs below – but first, we’ve highlighted some of the most exciting female tech leaders from across startup Europe. We have selected current female CTOs from the main European ecosystems in startups who have significant experience in the technology industry.

Are there any names we forgot? If a name is missing that you think should be on this list, or if any information is incorrect, please let us know by email. [email protected].

Sam Mountford – Enjoy

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to shape the future of events, Treat yourself brings the events back in person.

Feast It uses an algorithm to match clients planning events with vendors offering event services, such as catering and photography. And at the top of his technical team is Mountford.

Mountford’s first CTO job wasn’t at Feast It, however – she was previously CTO at Tech Nation Upscale alum, Cornerstone, which describes itself as “the UK’s largest online razor blade subscription”. After her stint as CTO at Cornerstone, Mountford was vice president of engineering at menswear startup Spoke, which raised $10.7 million Series B while she was in the role.

Marta Jasinska – Flower and wild

Jasinska is CTO at Bloom and Wild, another High-end Tech Nation alum. The startup’s main product is its “mailbox flowers” – bouquets of flowers sent to your door in a box. D2C raised a £30m Series D seed round and £20m debt funding last July, at a valuation of £400m.

Prior to joining Bloom and Wild, Jasinska was CTO at Moo, a business card production startup backed by Localglobe and Atlas Ventures.

Lethabo Motsoaledi — Voyc

Customer service is hot by the minute, with startups increasingly expected to take on the burden of take care of their customers.

It’s a valuable niche that Motsoaledi, co-founder and CTO of Voyc, has taken over. The Amsterdam-based startup uses AI to monitor and improve call center quality assurance and has raised $550,000 in seed funding. Techstars and SAP are investors.

Abby Senor — Citibeats

Citibeats is an AI startup that helps people understand societal changes in gender equality, sustainability, and health using natural language processing and machine learning. The company raised a €2m funding round in 2021 and counts Meta, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Development Program among its clients.

This isn’t Seneor’s first CTO rodeo; previously, she was co-founder and CTO of a sports SaaS, Optimi Health. Previously, she was the founder and CTO of BookEscapeRoom, an escape room aggregator and booking platform.

Beatrice Ionascu — imagiLabs

Not only does imagiLabs have a female CTO – the startup has a all-female founding team..

The Nordic startup aims to inspire and educate next generation of tech-savvy women, by teaching young girls to code using a small programmable accessory connected to a mobile phone. ImagiLabs has already raised a €250,000 pre-seed round from angel investors.

This isn’t the first time Ionascu has launched an initiative to encourage young girls to get into tech – in 2016 she co-founded weSTEM, a club for female students in Abu Dhabi to choose careers in STEM.

Gyri Reiersen — Tanso

Gyri Reiersen, CTO at Tanso
Gyri Reiersen, CTO at Tanso

Carbon accounting The startup Tanso was co-founded by Reiersen, who is also CTO. The Munich-based startup wants to make sustainability accounting as easy as financial accounting, enabling a low-carbon economy. It has already raised $1.9 million from investors including UVC Partners and Picus Capital.

Reiersen says she became interested in space”through his academic work researching the overstatement of carbon offsets through deep learning”.

Emily’s Castles – No Limits

Without Borders has always been emphasized as one to watch, not only as a startup enabling remote work, but also as a Irish startup.

The technology side of the business is led by Dublin-educated co-founder Castles. Previously, she was at Bizimply as Head of Engineering. The startup builds its software using Ruby on Rails and raised a €2.5 million funding round last June from Fyrfly Venture Partners and Ada Ventures.

Irina Bednova—Wireless

Bednova is CTO at Cordless, a London-based startup that leverages voice technology for customer service using the best elements of voice and text communication. They went from former Monzo CEO Tom Blomfield and Capital Passion.

Prior to joining Cordless, Bednova was a entrepreneur first cohort member. She also has a long background in software engineering — in fact, prior to EF, Bednova spent three years at Monzo as a senior software engineer.

Lou Fedon — Director of Engineering at 365Talents

Fedon isn’t technically CTO (she’s Director of Engineering) at 365Talents, but she’s one of the few female tech leaders in France that our readers have mentioned outside of Paris.

The AI-powered talent management platform raised a seed round in 2018 and recently raised another €10 million.

Prior to working at 365Talents, Fedon was Head of Engineering at LumApps – another employee experience platform – where she led the frontend, backend, mobile and support teams.

Maria Meier – Phantasma

Maria Meier, CTO at Phantasma

Meier leads the technical team at Phantasma Labs, a Berlin-based startup enabling safe interaction between self-driving cars and vulnerable road users. The startup raised a funding round in September 2020 and has since doubled its headcount.

Meier, educated in Munich, is another Entrepreneur First alumna and, alongside her role at Phantasma, she is an On Deck Deep Tech Fellow.

Amelia Webb is Social Media Manager at Sifted. She tweets from @AmeliaWebbNE

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Pay transparency narrows the college gender pay gap https://feminaust.org/pay-transparency-narrows-the-college-gender-pay-gap/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 15:55:08 +0000 https://feminaust.org/pay-transparency-narrows-the-college-gender-pay-gap/ Fig. 1: Equity in organizations: distribution of market wage residuals by gender and transparency shocks. Credit: DOI: 10.1038/s41562-022-01288-9 A pair of researchers, one at HEC Paris, Jouy-en-Josas, the other at the University of Utah, found that when universities make employee salaries public, the pay gap between gender is reduced. In their article published in the […]]]>

Fig. 1: Equity in organizations: distribution of market wage residuals by gender and transparency shocks. Credit: DOI: 10.1038/s41562-022-01288-9

A pair of researchers, one at HEC Paris, Jouy-en-Josas, the other at the University of Utah, found that when universities make employee salaries public, the pay gap between gender is reduced. In their article published in the journal Nature Human behaviorTomasz Obloj and Todd Zenger describe how they studied datasets containing gender and other demographic information, as well as salary data, for thousands of academics over twenty years and what they found found by focusing on the gender pay gap.

Previous research has shown that despite performing equal duties, men in academia are paid more on average than women. The problem has been allowed to persist, Obloj and Zenger suggest, because academic pay, like most other professions, is not made public. University women can’t complain about lower salaries if they don’t know how much their male colleagues earn. For this reason, some universities have started making salary information public, a policy known as salary transparency. In this new effort, the researchers investigated whether this led to a reduction in gender pay gaps.

The work involved obtaining datasets (using the Freedom of Information Act) on approximately 100,000 academics working at public universities in the United States from 1997 to 2017. The data came from both the universities that made public the salary information and those who did not, allowing comparisons to be made.

Data showed that making salary information readily available to people working at a given university tended to significantly reduce the gender pay gap, in many cases by as much as 50%. They also found that making salary information public led to a direct reduction in salary inequality between departments. Unfortunately, they also found that making salary information public also tended to weaken the link between pay and performance measures.

When universities instituted a transparency policy, salary changes began almost immediately, particularly involving those who appeared to be grossly underpaid. They conclude by suggesting that the establishment of salary transparency will have a very significant impact on the remuneration structures of academics.


Gender gap persists in doctors’ starting salaries


More information:
Tomasz Obloj et al, The Influence of Pay Transparency on (Gender) Inequality, Inequality and the Performance Basis of Pay, Nature Human behavior (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41562-022-01288-9

© 2022 Science X Network

Quote: Wage Transparency Narrows the Academic Gender Pay Gap (2022, February 25) Retrieved February 25, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-wage-transparency-academic-gender-gap. html

This document is subject to copyright. Except for fair use for purposes of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.

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Female university doctors will earn 10% less than men: study https://feminaust.org/female-university-doctors-will-earn-10-less-than-men-study/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 20:35:22 +0000 https://feminaust.org/female-university-doctors-will-earn-10-less-than-men-study/ According to a new study, researchers point the finger squarely at doctors’ starting salaries as the reason why women earn less than their male counterparts in academic medicine. Worse still, the earning potential of women in most specialties is $214,440 (or 10%) lower than that of their male colleagues during their careers in academic medicine. […]]]>

According to a new study, researchers point the finger squarely at doctors’ starting salaries as the reason why women earn less than their male counterparts in academic medicine. Worse still, the earning potential of women in most specialties is $214,440 (or 10%) lower than that of their male colleagues during their careers in academic medicine.


Doctors

Among the vast majority of subspecialties, women’s starting salaries and 10-year salaries were lower than those of their male colleagues in academic medicine, by study in JAMA Network Open.

Eva Catenaccio, MD, a epilepsy researcher at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and lead author of the study, said Medscape Medical News that gender disparities in earning potential are “pervasive in academic medicine”. These pay disparities, which occur in nearly every subspecialty and can run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars in the first 10 years of an academic physician’s career, “are largely the result of gender differences. in the annual salary that starts immediately after the training,” she said.

Changing the timing of academic promotion and equalizing starting salary and salary growth can help close the pay gap, Catenaccio said.

The study also reveals that women face a one-year delay in promotion from assistant to associate professor compared to men. This delay reduced the female physicians’ earning potential by a 10-year median of $26,042 (or 2%), while the complete absence of promotion reduced the 10-year earning potential by a median of $218,724 (or 13%).

Across medicine, male physicians continue to earn 35% more than their female colleagues, according to Medscape’s 2021 Physician Compensation Report. According to the report, the biggest differences in take-home pay exist between male and female specialists. On average, male physicians earn $376,000, while female take-home pay is $283,000.

Medical schools and hospital leaders have a role to play

According to the study, earning potential in the first 10 years of post-training employment by gender was most dramatic in neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery and cardiology. Three sub-specialties where women and men have similar earning potential are Pediatric Nephrology, Pediatric Neurology, and Pediatric Rheumatology.

The co-authors note that it is commonly believed that women do not negotiate as often or as successfully as their male colleagues. A 2019 study in JAMA Surgery of 606 male and female surgical residents found that while residents of both sexes shared similar career goals, women had lower future salary expectations and a significantly more negative view of the salary negotiation process.

Catenaccio and his co-authors agree that negotiation skills and financial literacy should be taught during medical school and postgraduate training. “However, the responsibility for ensuring pay equity should not rest solely with the individual candidate; rather, departmental and hospital leaders should take responsibility for ensuring uniform starting salaries and preventing gender-based inequities,” they wrote in the study.

“We hope this study will encourage academic medical institutions to increase transparency and equity in compensation, especially for junior faculty,” Catenaccio said. Medscape Medical News. “This will require both ensuring equal starting salaries and providing periodic adjustments throughout individuals’ careers to avoid discrepancies in earning potential by gender or any other individual characteristic.”

Harold Simon, MD, MBA, faculty vice chair of the Department of Pediatrics and professor of pediatric emergency medicine at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, said Medscape Medical News this “[i]nincreased transparency around pay can empower women to advocate for fair pay. However, the burden of ensuring equity should not fall on individuals, but rather be the primary responsibility of academic institutions.

Specifically, Simon is advocating for hospital leaders to “ensure equity among providers, including compensation [as] a crucial element in maintaining a diverse workforce and ultimately providing balanced access to healthcare for patients.

Additionally, the authors call for periodic compensation reviews and adjustments to help prevent gender-based salary differences between female and male physicians in academia. “This is absolutely necessary, both to develop future compensation plans and to address any pre-existing gender-based pay inequality for women currently well advanced in their careers,” they wrote in the study.

Data analysis was conducted from March to May 2021. Researchers used models to estimate the impacts of the timing of promotions and potential interventions, including equalizing starting salaries and annual salary rates.

The study included compensation data for 24,593 female and 29,886 male academic physicians in 45 subspecialties. He relied on publicly available data from the annual report of the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Faculty Salary Survey.

For more information, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, instagramand YouTube.

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Serena Williams says ‘it takes time’ to address gender pay equity in sport https://feminaust.org/serena-williams-says-it-takes-time-to-address-gender-pay-equity-in-sport/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 18:22:01 +0000 https://feminaust.org/serena-williams-says-it-takes-time-to-address-gender-pay-equity-in-sport/ Tennis superstar Serena Williams has long been an advocate for gender pay equity in sports, but she told CBS News in an interview that tackling inequality “takes time.” “You just can’t expect things to change overnight,” said the 23-time Grand Slam champion. Williams, 40, pointed out that those attitudes towards her are changing, especially when […]]]>

Tennis superstar Serena Williams has long been an advocate for gender pay equity in sports, but she told CBS News in an interview that tackling inequality “takes time.”

“You just can’t expect things to change overnight,” said the 23-time Grand Slam champion. Williams, 40, pointed out that those attitudes towards her are changing, especially when it comes to equal pay.

“I love that people are starting to recognize that women deserve equal pay and they deserve the same as a man,” she said.

Steps toward gender equality in sports pay have made “great strides over the past few decades,” Sarah Axelson, vice president of advocacy for the Women’s Sports Foundation, told CBS News on Friday. “But there is still a lot of room for improvement.”

United States F1 Grand Prix
Serena Williams has long been an advocate for gender equality in sport.

Clive Mason – Formula 1/Formule 1 via Getty Images


Tennis has been a bastion of gender equality after Wimbledon joined the other three Grand Slams in 2007 to pay female players the same amount as male players in prize money.

WNBA players have spoken out against the pay disparity between their league and the NBA for years. the New York Times reported earlier this month, the league had raised $75 million as it attempted to revamp its business model and address those concerns.

As the United States Women’s National Soccer Team continues to fight for equal pay, the The United States Soccer Federation announced last year, they will offer identical contracts to the men’s and women’s teams. The proposal would make both teams among the “highest paid senior national team players in the world”, the the federation said.

Prior to winning gold at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, the United States women’s national ice hockey team fought for equal pay and won.

Axelson said the discussion about the pay gap between male and female athletes is nuanced, depending on how the sports league or federation is organized, and women’s professional sports are relatively young compared to their male counterparts. For example, the WNBA is entering its 25th year, while the NBA is in its 76th year. And among the factors that play a role in equal pay are sponsorships, investment partners and media attention.

“Once there’s more attention and more visibility, people realize how great women’s athletics is, right? And their audience goes up. And so the investment goes up” , she said.

As Title IX’s 50th anniversary approaches in June, Axelson said, from school sports to professional women’s sports, there’s a “lack of investment everywhere,” despite the law being in place for decades.

“Time and time again, as people invest in sport, not only is it a good decision because it’s a good thing to do,” she said. “It’s a good business decision because women’s sports are worth investing in.”

Axelson’s nonprofit on Tuesday entered into a five-year partnership agreement with Michelob ULTRA, which will help fund the travel and training needed for female athletes to compete at a high level. The announcement also comes months after the beer brand pledged $100 million increase the visibility of female athletes.

Among their efforts were intentionally the same number of male and female athletes in upcoming commercials – such as the “Superior Bowl” commercial in which Williams appears for the Super Bowl.

“I commend them for uplifting female athletes and amplifying inclusivity on the biggest stage in the world…the Super Bowl,” Williams said. “It doesn’t really get any bigger than that.”

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Attys women face 11% pay gap in UK legal sector https://feminaust.org/attys-women-face-11-pay-gap-in-uk-legal-sector/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 21:20:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/attys-women-face-11-pay-gap-in-uk-legal-sector/ By Emily Lever (February 9, 2022, 4:20 PM EST) – Female lawyers in the English and Welsh legal sectors were paid 11.3% less than men in 2021, a slight decrease in the pay gap from 2020 which is lower than back to pre-pandemic levels, according to a Wednesday report from the Law Society Group. The […]]]>
By Emily Lever (February 9, 2022, 4:20 PM EST) – Female lawyers in the English and Welsh legal sectors were paid 11.3% less than men in 2021, a slight decrease in the pay gap from 2020 which is lower than back to pre-pandemic levels, according to a Wednesday report from the Law Society Group.

The median pay gap, or the difference between the median salaries of men and women, was 11.3%, according to data collected by the Law Society of England and Wales and the Solicitors Regulation Authority. The gap narrowed by 0.5% compared to 2020, but was still much wider than the 2019 statistic of 8.3% recorded before the…

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As a gay person and a person of color, I am mortified by the times I failed to acknowledge misogyny, says Leo Varadkar https://feminaust.org/as-a-gay-person-and-a-person-of-color-i-am-mortified-by-the-times-i-failed-to-acknowledge-misogyny-says-leo-varadkar/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 07:06:56 +0000 https://feminaust.org/as-a-gay-person-and-a-person-of-color-i-am-mortified-by-the-times-i-failed-to-acknowledge-misogyny-says-leo-varadkar/ IRELAND has made great strides in tackling gender inequality in recent years, but there is still a long way to go. A recent survey found that 93% of women said they felt vulnerable because of their gender. 3 Tanaiste Leo Varadkar writes for the Irish Sun on male violence against womenCredit: Niall Carson/PA Wire 3 […]]]>

IRELAND has made great strides in tackling gender inequality in recent years, but there is still a long way to go.

A recent survey found that 93% of women said they felt vulnerable because of their gender.

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Tanaiste Leo Varadkar writes for the Irish Sun on male violence against womenCredit: Niall Carson/PA Wire
Our new campaign invites people to take a stand

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Our new campaign invites people to take a stand

And Women’s Aid reported that 244 women have died violently since 1996.

Some 152 of them were killed in their own homes and 87% died at the hands of a man they knew.

That’s why the Irish Sun and our radio partners at Wireless Group Radio Stations come together to say enough is enough.

Today, Tanaïst LEO VARADKAR supports our campaign and explains why it is essential that we move forward with the introduction of a zero tolerance policy on male violence against women.

However, the Fine Gael leader says there is also a need to work on other inequalities like everyday misogyny and rebalancing the gender pay gap.

Most read in The Irish Sun

By Tanaiste Leo Varadkar

Ashling Murphy’s death was a watershed moment. On that tragic day, the country came to a standstill.

We all took a moment to reflect on the horror of what had happened to this brilliant young woman, whose life was full of promise and who brought happiness to so many others.

It also – again – brought to light the recent murders of other women – Marioara Rostas, Urantsetseg Tserendorj, Jastine Valdez. The awful truth is that there are many, many more.

Most men are not violent towards women, but when a woman is abused, the aggressor is almost always a man. How can one live in a society where such horrors are perpetrated?

The truth, of course, almost always comes down to how women are treated in general and how they have been treated over the centuries. In other words, to misogyny.

Whether we like to admit it or not, almost all men are capable of misogyny. We are a product of the society we live in, the way we were brought up, and the behavior of other men around us.

Sometimes it’s just the “little things” – sexist jokes, assumptions about gender roles at home or at work, exclusion of women in decision-making, gendered or symbolic language. These little things add up to big things – a culture of sexism.

So, we have to change and especially men. By making changes in our daily lives, we can make Ireland and the world a better and safer place to be a woman.

This means saying stop when women are interrupted or ignored in conversations.
It means changing our behavior online. This means focusing on what women have achieved, rather than how they look. And we cannot tolerate overtly sexist humor.

Above all, it means trying to see the world from the perspective of women and girls.

I know from talking to my friends, my sisters, and the women I work with, how bad things can be and the obstacles that still exist. I also know that I often don’t see them unless they are pointed out to me by the women in my life.

When they do, I feel mortified that it wasn’t obvious to me. But as a gay person and a person of color, I can relate to how they feel and also why people can lack awareness or insight without being malicious or even realizing it.

The governments in which I have served have worked tirelessly to improve the conditions and rights of women. We have increased resources, provided additional staff and new funds for the Gardai so they can set up special casualty units in every division.

Justice Minister Helen McEntee has pledged a zero tolerance approach to violence against women in a new gender-based violence strategy, and will ensure that anyone in need of a place in a shelter in get one.

The gender pay gap is unjustified. Many women actually work for free the last month of every year.

Closing the gender pay gap was a priority – and enabled us to pass a new law that requires companies to publish pay details for men and women. This law is in place and the gap is narrowing.

I started the “Balance for Better Business” to increase the number of women at the highest levels of business. We are making progress and are ahead of our targets.

Fine Gael has worked to increase the number of women in politics. We have introduced gender quotas for the Dail to ensure that all parties field at least 30% women candidates in general elections, as well as incentives to field more women in town and county councils.

We have more female councilors than any other party. Of the six people I have appointed to the Cabinet, three are women and I have used my four Seanad appointments to increase the number of women in Leinster House. But it’s not enough.

Until we reach parity, 50-50 or very close, our democracy is incomplete. This year, we will therefore have a series of initiatives to encourage women to become more involved in politics. In the next elections, at least 40% of our candidates will be women.

This generation of women should be the last to feel discriminated against, objectified, overlooked for promotion, expected to shoulder a disproportionate share of family responsibilities, or paid less than their male peers for the same work.

Not everyone has gotten the message yet. It is up to each of us to make the change.

A photograph of Ashling Murphy amongst flowers and candles in a makeshift shrine during a vigil in her memory at Leinster House, Dublin

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A photograph of Ashling Murphy amongst flowers and candles in a makeshift shrine during a vigil in her memory at Leinster House, DublinCredit: Brian Lawless/PA Wire
It’s time to end violence against women – join our campaign to call it
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Tulane’s pay inequality higher than peer institutions, federal data shows • The Tulane Hullabaloo https://feminaust.org/tulanes-pay-inequality-higher-than-peer-institutions-federal-data-shows-the-tulane-hullabaloo/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 02:38:16 +0000 https://feminaust.org/tulanes-pay-inequality-higher-than-peer-institutions-federal-data-shows-the-tulane-hullabaloo/ Pay inequity poses a significant challenge in retaining high-quality female talent nationally. (Gabe Darley) Female professors at Tulane University earn nearly 22% less on average than their male colleagues, Data from the U.S. Department of Education shows. For these teachers, that deficit is equal to tens of thousands of dollars in lost revenue amid galloping […]]]>
Pay inequity poses a significant challenge in retaining high-quality female talent nationally. (Gabe Darley)

Female professors at Tulane University earn nearly 22% less on average than their male colleagues, Data from the U.S. Department of Education shows. For these teachers, that deficit is equal to tens of thousands of dollars in lost revenue amid galloping inflation in the USA.

In 2020, the average salary for male professors was $121,053, compared to the average salary of $94,997 for female professors.

On average, male professors earned $26,056, or 21.5% more than their female counterparts at Tulane on average.

Pay inequality in Tulane varies widely by tenure status and longevity.

Female assistant professors earned an average of $93,870 in salary. Male assistant professors, however, earned an average of $115,843, or 18.9% more than their female counterparts.

Assistant professor positions are the first step on the ladder to tenure, similar to entry-level doctoral positions. holders. Tulane assistant professors have five years demonstrate mastery of their field – through academic papers, books, and research – to earn tenure.

Tulane declined to leave management available for comment..

In a written statement, Mike Strecker, assistant vice president of communications, said, “Tulane is committed to pay equity at all levels. The Provost and Deans regularly review salaries to ensure that all faculty are fairly compensated. Within departments and disciplines, salary is strongly correlated to the number of years a faculty member has worked at the university.

A demonstration of a bar graph of pay differences at Tulane University based on gender and academic rank.
Database reflects 2020 salaries submitted by Tulane University to the U.S. Department of Education and requisitioned from federal datasets. (Rohan Goswami)

As female assistant professors earn nearly $22,000 less than their male counterparts at Tulane, the gap is narrowing among full professors.

A tenured professorship is the highest position on the tenure track. At Tulane, female tenured professors earn on average just under 98% of what male professors do.

The gender pay gap in academia is well documented in Scientific Research and federal data. But the explanation for Tulane’s pay gap may not be as simple as overt gender discrimination.

“The main reason for the gender gap is going to be broader societal factors,” patrick button, an associate professor of economics at Tulane, said. Button described the driving force behind the gender pay gap as “pipeline issues.”

The “leaky pipeline” is the phenomenon whereby female university aspirants in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics have few female role models, lack control over research and work, and end up leaving their chosen field before entering a teaching position.

The pay gap problem is seen on a societal level, “more broadly than Tulane’s,” Button said.

“A lot of the time, it may be that because women get less mentorship, or they face more discriminatory barriers in the profession — and that extends beyond Tulane, of course — that can reduce the number of women who are able to… get a tenure position,” Button said.

According to Button, the situation for women in the academy is difficult nationally, not just at Tulane.

“There are other institutional factors that may matter,” Button said. “Women often bear a disproportionate burden of childcare, elder care.”

“If there are fewer resources provided in graduate programs or when individuals are in college in terms of childcare,” Button said, “then it can make it more difficult to balance their disproportionate childcare responsibilities and their academic responsibilities as well.”

Tulane’s pay gap was higher than that of 21 of the 37 universities the Department of Education considers to be in Tulane’s peer group.

In this peer group, which included the eight Ivy League schools, Stanford University, University of Chicago and Vanderbilt University, male professors earned an average of 20.6% more than their female counterparts. .

The average salary for women in the peer group was $122,509, compared to $154,823 for men.

“Tulane also has processes and resources available to any faculty or staff member who suspects that they or others are experiencing pay inequality. The Office of Human Resources and Institutional Equity investigates such reports thoroughly,” Strecker said.

Tulane ranked second to last in average pay for both men and women.

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Yukon surpasses 20-year low for gender equity among deputy ministers – Yukon News https://feminaust.org/yukon-surpasses-20-year-low-for-gender-equity-among-deputy-ministers-yukon-news/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://feminaust.org/yukon-surpasses-20-year-low-for-gender-equity-among-deputy-ministers-yukon-news/ [ad_1] Three shifts, hirings and departures of deputy ministers since September 2021 have resulted in a new low for the participation of women in the highest ranks of the Yukon public service. Aja Mason, executive director of the Yukon Status of Women Council, called the situation “deeply concerning”. Women’s participation in deputy minister circles was […]]]>


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Three shifts, hirings and departures of deputy ministers since September 2021 have resulted in a new low for the participation of women in the highest ranks of the Yukon public service.

Aja Mason, executive director of the Yukon Status of Women Council, called the situation “deeply concerning”.

Women’s participation in deputy minister circles was precariously low this year, but with the departure of Valerie Royle in September and the permanent appointment of Justin Ferbey to his old post, coupled with the appointment of Michael Hale as deputy. Additional Minister of Health, the percentage of participation of women at the top of the administrative hierarchy fell further.

At 17 percent, the ratio of female deputy ministers is lower than it was 20 years ago.

Data provided on December 23 by the Yukon Public Service Commission showed that in 2020, three out of 16 positions were filled by women. From 2005 to 2010, the number increased to four. In 2015, there were five women in 15 positions. Then 2020 fell to four out of 16, and now at the end of 2021 there are three women in the 18 Deputy Minister (DM00) positions.

If one reads the positions as a percentage of the total for each of the additional years, the figures are: 2000 – 19%, 2005 – 29%, 2010 – 27%, 2015 – 33%, 2020 – 25%.

December 2021 has the lowest rate with just 17% of deputy minister positions being women.

All deputy heads are hired by the prime minister. This means that Sandy Silver is laying off, hiring and mixing all the top officials himself. Since 2015, three additional deputy level positions have been added to the top rung of the bureaucratic ladder.

Mason says the problem with a male dominated lens at the top of the administrative hierarchy is not only that women’s issues and concerns are not reflected in decisions made by government, but also that the quality of decisions. , in general, suffers.

In other words, men’s concerns and issues tend to dominate conversations, policies, and decisions.

Salaries and bonuses

The Yukon government, while much less straightforward than many of its provincial counterparts, publishes annual salary ranges for executive positions on its website, but not by number or gender. Some provincial governments publish the data with names.

Soon to be released information for 2022 shows that a deputy minister or president of a corporation (DM00) in one of the 18 designated positions of the Government of Yukon, will earn between $ 190,000 and $ 254,000 per year.

Additionally, since deputy ministers are eligible for an annual performance bonus of up to 10%, this could mean that the most paid deputy ministers receive up to $ 280,000 per year, plus benefits. social, vacation and other allowances.

The salary gap between deputy ministers and assistant deputy ministers is approximately $ 50,000 per year (46,000 at the lower level and 58,000 at the maximum level). The discretionary performance bonus for ADMs and other managers is seven percent.

Lower-level managers (MG6) in the Government of Yukon earn between $ 88,000 and $ 122,000, which is still half the annual amount of MPs.

Policy watchers and researchers across the country have kept tabs on progress on the pay gap and the percentage of female executives and deputy ministers who are female, and often cite that the gap between men and women women in the highest echelons does not appear. to be in motion. It looks like 2022 will start with the Yukon government having fewer women earning anywhere near the best wages for senior men.

Government can and should work harder to reduce the barriers women face, Mason said.

“The Yukon Territorial Government has an obligation to ensure that women are represented at multiple levels of government, not just in the lowest paid and least powerful positions,” she said.

Contact Lawrie Crawford at lawrie.crawford@yukon-news.com

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Sharing hard-earned money lessons to build generational wealth https://feminaust.org/sharing-hard-earned-money-lessons-to-build-generational-wealth/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:00:22 +0000 https://feminaust.org/sharing-hard-earned-money-lessons-to-build-generational-wealth/ [ad_1] Julien and Kiersten Saunders, creators of the Rich & Regular blog, go so far as to call the “R word” “retirement”. Gaining that independence is crucial now, they say, not just after 65. And they encourage their audiences, which they reach on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, to look for out-of-the-box ways to do […]]]>


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Julien and Kiersten Saunders, creators of the Rich & Regular blog, go so far as to call the “R word” “retirement”. Gaining that independence is crucial now, they say, not just after 65. And they encourage their audiences, which they reach on YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, to look for out-of-the-box ways to do it.

“Minority communities are obsessed and focused on earning more income from their work,” said Mr Saunders, 41, who, along with his wife, started giving personal finance advice in 2017. “We steer them towards passive income that doesn’t require the middleman, permission or promotion. Passive income could come from the rental of goods or, for digital creators like them, sponsored content, he said.

Debt relief is a huge topic within the online personal finance community. Debt, including student loans, credit cards, and medical bills, disproportionately affects people of color in the United States. The typical debt load of black and Hispanic Americans was 46% of their assets in 2019, compared to 29% for whites. And about 21% of African American borrowers were behind on their student loan payments, compared to 6% of white borrowers, according to a 2020 study by the Aspen Institute.

Leo Jean-Louis, known as the Millennial Debt Freedom Coach on Instagram, advises his 50,000+ followers to bring their debt balances to zero by incorporating the lessons he and his wife, Faith, learned after paying over $ 200,000 in less than three years. An occupational therapist by training, he took weekend and vacation shifts, and the couple cut expenses by canceling cable, cooking meals, car pooling and more. He said the pandemic recession had sparked engagement and more questions from his supporters.

“I have also seen an increase in the share of other platforms willing to disseminate information,” said Jean-Louis. “Other Instagram influencers have been looking for collaborations.”

For influencers, the gender pay gap is a major issue. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, women generally earned about 18% less than their male counterparts in 2020, and the gap was much larger for black and Hispanic women. Black women in the professions earned only 68 percent of what their white male colleagues earned.


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